August 27th, 2008 • Comments: 0 • by Wendy • Breast is BestHuman Milk Banking PumpingResources

Breastmilk Storage Guidelines

Hi everyone, This table is an essential for all bleary-eyed, sleep-deprived, pumping moms out there!

Human Milk

Room Temperature

Refrigerator

Time in Freezer

freshly expressed

≤ 4 hours at 26˚C/79˚F ≤ 24 hours at 15˚C/59˚F* *(cooler with frozen gel packs)

≤ 8 days at ≤ 4˚C/39˚F

≤ 12 months at 18˚C to 20˚C below zero/ 64 to 68˚F

previously frozen, thawed in refrigerator but not warmed

≤ 4 hours

≤ 24 hours

do NOT refreeze

previously frozen and brought to room temperature

for completion of current feed

4 hours

do NOT refreeze

infant has started feeding

only for completion of feeding, then discard

discard

discard

frozen donor human milk

only for completion of feeding, then discard

≤ 24 hours

do NOT refreeze

© Human Milk Banking Association of North America, Inc.  www.hmbana.org

June 23rd, 2008 • Comments: 0 • by Wendy • Carnival of BreastfeedingInside SnugabellPumpingResources

I was "Pumped" to Launch My Business...

How Breastpumping Inspired Me to Quit my Job and Launch my own Business!

Welcome Carnival of Breastfeeding Readers! 

When I found out I was pregnant with my first child at 38, a good friend of mine asked me if I was going to pump.  I looked at her quizzically and asked, “Why would I need to?”  She went on to tell me that she and her husband had chosen to pump primarily so that he could feed the baby and therefore bond with her as she was.

That night, I talked to my husband about it.  My husband, Mike, is one of the most endearingly sensitive men I have ever met.  He cried when he said his vows at our wedding, he cried when our daughters were born and he cried when he kissed my belly for our pregnancy photos.  He said the pumping sounded like a good idea.  (All this and he rides a Harley too!)

After our daughter was born and we waited the recommended 4-6 weeks before introducing a bottle, I sat down at the kitchen table and stuck these plastic funnel doo-hickeys on my breasts and lo and behold, the milk started flowing into the bottles!  Who knew?  And needless to say, Mike cried the first time he fed each of our daughters.

When I started to pump on a daily basis, I experimented with various positions and locations around the house.  I leaned-up against the kitchen table to try to pin the horns between my body and the table so that I could at least turn the pages in a magazine, however it didn’t work too well - I couldn’t turn the pages (even with my elbows) and it was pretty uncomfortable.  I tried to simply hold the horns with my hands, however, my Carpal Tunnel Syndrome caused them to go numb and ache within a few minutes.

So I plunked myself down in front of my computer and Googled “pump hands-free”.  I found a handful of products, all of which were expensive, fiddly and “less than attractive” (insert eye roll here).  Why is it, that when we become a mom, it is assumed that we no longer have any style?

I let the idea stew in the back of my mind for a week or so, and then I decided to try to construct something on my sewing machine that would hold the horns for me.

Three years of research and development later, my website selling PumpEase™ hands-free pumping supports went live!  I now have the freedom to stay at home with my two girls (3-1/2 years and 17 months) and be a WAHM and entrepreneur.  Equally as important to me is knowing that I am helping pumping moms everywhere to pump with style and comfort, to pump pain-free, to extend their nursing relationships with their babies and to make much-needed donations to breast milk banks.

Be sure to check out these great posts from our blogging friends: